Friday, February 26, 2010

Patience


For a time yesterday when death seemed irrevocably near, I did what any good poet-husband would do: I paid the bills, balanced our meager checkbook, dusted the piano and the pictures of the kids in our bedroom, finished the leftover potato salad and the plastic container of sliced olives, had coffee with two friends of our friend who died, discovered in them the same bright warmth of the one now gone, returned home, found death twiddling his thumbs, and smiled when I heard him say, “Now, where were we?”


Update:
“Patience” added to Poems, Slightly Used.

2.26.2010 #2
2.26.2010 #1 (poem)


11 comments:

Paul L. Martin said...

I keep thinking, and even seeing: death and life are our constant companions on this journey. I don't know if that makes things easier to accept, but I sure feel it these days.

William Michaelian said...

Or, to put it another way, life and death are the journey, and along the way we are their companions for a time. And I don’t know if that makes it easier either. I feel it too. It’s a good feeling, and one that hurts like hell.

Anthony Duce said...

Life is the journey. Death is just a reminder to make the most of every day of our journey. I liked how you expressed loss and moving forward. Thank you.

ALeks said...

Later.....

William Michaelian said...

Anthony, you’re quite right. Life is the journey. And yet life and death are mutually dependent. Well — it’s all part of the same grand movement, I guess. I know one thing: I’m glad to be here, and I appreciate your response. Or is that two things? Anyway, thanks.

Aleksandra, you are an optimist!

Elisabeth said...

I read your post, William and the words from one of Warren Zevon's songs tumble into my head:
‘Don’t let us get sick
Don’t let us get old
Don’t let us get stupid, all right.
But let us be brave
And let us be nice
And let us stay together tonight.

Thanks for this. It's beautiful and comforting even as it is confronting.

William Michaelian said...

Thanks, Elisabeth. The irony of it all is that I am still here, and the bills have continued to arrive. So I guess I can be stupid and brave all over again!

Joseph Hutchison said...

You well know the bills will continue to arrive after you're gone—for awhile, at least—and the dust will keep doing what dust does. Installments on the death plan, designed that way because the Old Guy has too much time on his hands.

William Michaelian said...

In that case, he can have my dust rag and calculator. But not my keyboard — I have plans for that.

Joseph Hutchison said...

Postcards from Over the Edge? Oh, wait--you're already doing that!

William Michaelian said...

Yes, and it’s all going into my new book, An Afterlife of Folly....