Friday, March 26, 2010

Until Further Notice


The difference between reality and imagination is itself imagined. What need for a dividing line at all? To spare us the fear of knowing we don’t know?

Note: I posted this as a “Note” on Facebook yesterday. Little by little, I’m getting used to things in that new environment. But of course much remains to be explored. I have met a lot of interesting new people — readers, writers, poets, artists — and look forward to meeting many more. There’s so much fine work out there to stimulate the mind and senses — that is, if the mind is not a sense itself, and the senses don’t have minds of their own.


Update:
In the Forum: an arbitrary middle leads to a conclusive beginning, but not until you reach the end.

10 comments:

Elisabeth said...

I find Facebook a tad too overwhelming, William. I check it but I tend not to add much. For me it has a breathless quality and I'm already in too much of a rush.

I agree with you about not needing a dividing line between reality and imagination, at least in certain situations.

William Michaelian said...

Indeed, Facebook is like standing in a whirlwind. Better wear goggles, because what you imagine is real enough to get into your eyes!

-K- said...

At this point, I prefer the relative one-on-oneness of a blog than the party chatter of Facebook. Altho FB is quite a bit more versatile, so many vidoes and articles these days have the FB icon that it's simple to pass on something that I find interesting. And other kindred spirits do the same thing.

ALeks said...

Same as Elisabeth,and I am not that great in finding the right way of dealing with all the extra things on it.Ever since I am on the facebook,from the moment I made the link to my blogs my PC is crashing.Windows is telling me of disastrous damage and that I need to make backup of my files and save whatever I can save.Not nice at all.But Im happy that I founded my old friends back home and can see my parents and my family,so it is double feeling.You are real celebrity,I wish you much fun and good connections on it,good day and greetings!
Aleksandra

William Michaelian said...

Kevin, you’re right, the party chatter is there, but when necessary, I find it relatively easy to ignore. And yet, I’m always on the lookout for words and phrases in different configurations and combinations, so sometimes I leave the volume up, so to speak. Like most any kind of noise, if you listen to it for a while, I mean really listen, you begin to notice rhythms and patterns. Especially considering the different languages one encounters. I’ve also noticed quite a few people do conduct themselves on more of a one-on-one basis. The whole thing is like a vast study of personalities. In the end, it’s just another way to feel our way through this strange online universe of ours.

Aleksandra, my approach to new (for me) technology is always the same. I ease my way into it and I don’t worry about using all of the so-called features. Little by little, I catch on by watching what others are doing. And I always ask myself, is being able to do this or that really useful? Just because we can, doesn’t mean we should. Meanwhile, I know you’ve been having computer problems for some time now. I haven’t had any problems since I started using Facebook, but sometimes computer problems can be hard to trace. That’s why I’m glad I have a son who’s a computer expert! And yet he still loves reading and collecting used books, just like his old man — who is not a celebrity, because if he was, someone else would have come along and set up a big fan page for him by now!

ALeks said...

HA!! How do we do that???? You are fortunate to have children,I knew that as I now that this is
a goed idea,thats a great idea!! Who to call a director of a new formed fan page of Mr.Michaelian?? :O)
Im too chaotic for that,can not take care of my own pages so .......
I do hope someone will do it,you deserve it!

William Michaelian said...

I don’t know about that, but the funny thing is, since you wrote your comment I have received at least ten invitations to join fan pages of writers and artists — and all of them were set up by the writers and artists themselves. And so in Facebook we live in the world of instant celebrity!

Conrad DiDiodato said...

William,

a book you might find interesting is Andrew Keen's "the cult of the amateur", a pretty critical look at Web 2.0. Keen also talks about the "instant celebrity" syndrome of Facebook.

It offers a lot of interesting examples (and reveals a first-hand knowledge of Internet technology and trends!) but I find the reasoning pretty simplistic, specious in a lot areas. We're living in a very different world, one that makes getting on board the new technology pretty much a necessity.

William Michaelian said...

Conrad, I appreciate the input. For years now, the running joke in my family is that if it weren’t for the Web, I wouldn’t exist. Pull the plug and I’d disappear right into thin air — a thought, oddly enough, that has its own strange appeal. I imagine myself landing somewhere in nineteenth century Russia, or behind an ox and plow in a deep, fertile plain, singing my heart out for the wind and rain and stars. And yet the fact remains, you and I and everyone else who meets here, wouldn’t have the chance to become acquainted if it weren’t for the Web. As for celebrity, we’re always grabbing at straws, trying to make our way and to make a name for ourselves. But the whole process can and is happening much faster now, and it’s easier than ever to fall in love with this instant public image of ourselves, which is fueled by so much empty praise and glib, meaningless attention. As individuals, if we believe it all, we’re done for — mere fodder in someone else’s commercial plan. At the same time, through this very same technology, we each have the power to create and foster good relations, to learn, to teach, to share, to help, and to be humbled. And so you’re right — we’re living in a very different world. It’s certainly different than the one I grew up in, and am carrying forward into this new realm, which is really just a tiny blip in time — another grand age of hieroglyphics. And here ends my speech. By golly, I don’t know what got into me!

Conrad DiDiodato said...

William,

without Internet I'd disappear, too. That's a fact. And I'd have been unable to access so much information on hitherto unexplored topics (such as Internet technology itself), made almost instantly available at a click of the mouse. It's literally astounding to me that every day I can talk to you, Laura, Vassilis,Aleksandra, Ciao, etc: poets, artists, psychologists from anywhere in the world, from which I gather wisdom and knowledge. Internet is a window on infinite worlds.

I also like to think of the Internet as a technology in the same way paint was a technology for van Gogh, marble for da Vinci, mathematics for Einstein. A means of production only: the impetus (and creativity) to produce works of art is something
technology facilitates but never creates.

"The times they are a changin"