Thursday, April 8, 2010

You’re It


It’s interesting when you’re tagged by a new artist-friend on Facebook in a sensuous painting of a woman’s backside. Granted, the experience is diluted a bit when you’re tagged along with seventeen other perfect strangers, who might, after a few hasty mouse-clicks, become your friends as well. It’s also an intriguing way to see, within the space of a few minutes, what others around the world are doing, and if it relates in any way to your own endeavors. To be sure, mediocrity is alive and well, but so is the creative urge that drives some to greatness and others to despair — two raging states of being that so often walk hand in hand. Meanwhile, thanks to technology, it’s more possible than ever to be anonymous and isolated in public. It’s as if we have created, in effect, virtual gutters and asylums for our dreams and wayward souls. And yet, what’s not to love, when you love it all?

Note: I posted this as a note yesterday on my Facebook page.


Recently Linked: Once again, I’d like to direct your attention to the “Circulation” area in the sidebar. It’s always a pleasure to welcome new followers — those brave enough and kind enough to show their faces here, and whose work, thoughts, and ideas merit further investigation. Thank you!

Update:
In the Forum: Our fearful trip is done.

4 comments:

Wine and Words said...

Two raging states walking hand in hand. I was just speaking of this the other day, considering how so many comedians struggle with depression, and how many poets seem lonely. Are we a slave to our gifts, or are our gifts born of struggle. I wonder...

William Michaelian said...

Or both...

Anthony Duce said...

I agree with what you are saying, except I think the same issues have always been. The Internet community just changes the proportions and moves everything along at a much faster pace.

William Michaelian said...

Thanks. Absolutely. That’s why I said “more possible than ever...”

By coincidence, I heard from a friend of mine in NYC this morning, who said he couldn’t count the number of times he’s seen people crying in the street, and that he believes many people have something worthwhile to say, but haven’t the forum to do so. To that end, he’s considering a sort of tent project, a place where people could stop by and share whatever’s on their mind, be it political, social, or personal.