Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Source


                  Hell is deep —

          all the more astonishing to look up,


                  then, and be blinded by

                                  the light.



Note: I’m still feeling my way through Dante’s Divine Comedy — Hell, to be precise. I’ve just finished Henry F. Cary’s “Hell,” and am ready as hell to read John Aitken Carlyle’s “Inferno.” After that, I’ll move on to Melville Best Anderson’s “Purgatorio.”

9 comments:

Jan said...

What the hell, William! Is the devil making you do this?
Have a great day!!!
Jan

William Michaelian said...

I will, Jan, as soon as he hands out sun glasses.

Wine and Words said...

A little dark reading? Is it hot in here, or is it just me?

William Michaelian said...

Dante’s punishments are so vivid and severe, I’d say there is plenty of heat to go around.

Transcend Designs said...

Love this,
very uplifting...

Paints a great picture William...

Old 333 said...

Never look up! Angel droppings might get in your eye.

I remember my folks having a Book-Of-The-Month Dante with the Dore (silent egout there) engravings, when I was small - a formative and pleasing book, alongside Sagan's Cosmos and a lot of moldering science fiction magazines.

William Michaelian said...

Thanks very much, Brad!

Peter, those Doré (alt + 0233, in case you’re interested) engravings are great. I have the over-sized Dover edition of them right here, along with his work for Paradise Lost and The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Oh — and thanks for the advice.

erin said...

yes, no matter how pressed into darkness you are

when you look up...

that should keep us warm, shouldn't it?

xo
erin

William Michaelian said...

Erin, I think looking up means we are warm, which in turn means anything is possible.