Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Gabriella Mirollo: Studies in Contrast




“And when your face begins to disappear, who are you?”





Studies in Contrast
by Gabriella Mirollo


(2011)




“I have long wrestled with issues and ironies
of concealment and disclosure, isolation and connection,
and the play of light and dark in my life and work.”


These thoughts and more, insightfully explored in black-and-white.



14 comments:

Two Tigers said...

My dear friend, thank you so much for spotlighting my work this way! I guess this means my book has safely arrived? It makes me happy to think of it there in your home where it will feel welcome among kindred artistic and literary spirits, from all times and places. Oh the conversations that must go on at night...

Enjoy.

William Michaelian said...

And some days, like now, they go on past dawn. Yes, I’m delighted to report your book’s safe arrival, and it’s lovely in every way. Tangible evidence of your journey as it continues to unfold. Thank you, Gabriella, for making it possible.

jasmin said...

William, wie reagieren wir auf ein Leid, und wie kann dieses Gefühl des körperlichen Schmerzes, des quälenden Schmerzes, auf positive Weise betrachtet werden?
Eine Möglichkeit „das Buch“ von Gabriella, aus ihrer Sicht des Betroffen seins. Von innen nach außen die Fragen und Antworten.
Den tieferen Sinn des Leidens erkennen, das hilft es tragen.
gute Wünsche Jasmin
oh, hoffentlich ist die Übersetzung korrekt.....

William Michaelian said...

Thank you, Jasmin. Even in our mother tongue, meaning is elusive. Gabriella’s images speak a language of their own, of course, and are open, just as words are, to interpretation. But they also have a certain freedom, and lay claim to thoughts and experiences unique to the artist herself. And yet because they are so patiently and lovingly rendered, we who view them also recognize ourselves. Our joyous response is what keeps art alive.

Caio Fern said...

great book, great Gabriella.

Hello William !

William Michaelian said...

Hello, Caio!

On this we agree, and are pleased to tell the world....

Theanne and Baron said...

"The unexamined life is not worth living" ~ Socrates Ms. Mirollo certainly appears to be examining her life quite intensely with her book Studies in Contrast. I haven't read her book, only the "blurb," however I am considering it.

William Michaelian said...

Thank you, Theanne, that’s wonderful to hear. If you haven’t already, you can see a preview of Gabriella’s book by clicking on the “Blurb” link. And as enticing as the preview is, the images really come to life on the beautiful glossy paper.

Two Tigers said...

Hi again - just a note to your followers, William, that I have just made some copies of my book available for purchase directly from my blogsite if they are unfamiliar (or unregistered) with Blurb and would prefer an easier option. Thanks again for bringing such loving attention to my work!

William Michaelian said...

My pleasure, Gabriella. All the better. And my link to your Introduction will take us right to that option.

Jan said...

It is a fantastic book, William. No words are needed with photos such as these to tell a story. Gabriella is very talented~~~

William Michaelian said...

She’s another flower blooming in our midst, Jan, and it’s just like you to take notice. Thank you, as always.

Wine and Words said...

I've forgotten about this. Says much for me...that I could have. Another ding on my record. But there have been so many deep cuts in my own skin since then.

I remember reading her before the book. Her self portraits. Bravery is beauty. It is more beautiful that the mathmatical equation of beauty, of which only god himself had a hand in. Meaningless as anything of our own doing. I think she's beautiful. And yet I forgot her. I am sad at myself.

William Michaelian said...

Annie, I am no longer surprised when this happens to me — and it does happen, and I’m sure it will go on happening. We can only absorb and contain so much at any given time. And who knows that it really isn’t better that way, that after passing through more of whatever our own strife and joy may be, that we aren’t better prepared to receive the gift that we overlooked before. As long as we’re alert and alive, we have another chance. And really, isn’t that at least part of what books and art are about — the opportunity they afford to return to them next week, next year, or many years from now, to enjoy them and find out how much we have learned and changed? You’re here now, that’s what matters.