Sunday, January 8, 2012

Preposterous and Untenable


A sublime, medicinal, addictive aspect of doing almost nothing but reading for several days is how far away from, and into, oneself one travels; but this awareness pales before the sudden, seemingly accidental realization that, in the process, what formerly was taken for “real life” is now preposterous and even untenable, and must be appreciated and understood as fiction if it is to be plausible and liveable at all.

Yes, I have been reading. And to a very large degree, reading for me is much as it was when I was a boy growing up in California’s San Joaquin Valley: a refuge wide as an old shade tree, a sparkling glass of ice-cold lemonade, a log on the fire when vineyards and orchards are ice-bound and shrouded in fog, each savored and held simultaneously in the mind, all to a whisper offered by the sweet, sensuous lips of an imagined, more-real-than-real Beloved.

The very same, of course, can be said for writing.

My computer is running again, new hard drive and all. On the technical front, it has been an expensive, trying week, and it will be a while yet before my system is in full and comfortable working order. And the same goes for my computer.


18 comments:

temporal rooms said...

glad you are back
William, Michael, William. love the last line.
keeps everything in perspective. ~robert

William Michaelian said...

Perspective, Robert? What on earth is that? Either way, I’m glad to be here, wherever here is.

vazambam (Vassilis Zambaras) said...

Hear, hear--let's give a rousing cheer! William's back where he should be--here,here!

(Sorry for the above--I was a basketball player, not a cheerleader!)

William Michaelian said...

Hence your slam-dunk here, hear?

-K- said...

Sorry about your trouble. I came to your site to see what's happening as I've noticed there hasn't been too much Facebook activity from you lately.

William Michaelian said...

Thanks, Kevin. And wouldn’t you know it — all along, my face has been in a book.

donnafleischer said...

Welcome back from the tech battle field, William. Another artist friend in the midst of grant applications recently told me with exasperation "One can't just make art anymore. You have to know all these computer programs to upload and download your life!"

William Michaelian said...

Donna, it can certainly feel that way. It makes me want to grab a shovel and dig a deep hole under the walnut tree, just as I did when I was a kid, and then jump in there with my comic books — oops, I mean a collection of fine literature — and let the world go by.

Stickup Artist said...

If we are blogging and commenting, we've all been there at least once, if not multiple times. It's exasperating and expensive to be sure, but being forced to disconnect does have its own rewards. Love the passage referring to your boyhood. Sounds like such a great starting point for a satisfying life...

William Michaelian said...

Yes, and as I go back, it carries me forward.

What it boils down to, I think, is that we’re lucky with the Web connection, and we’re lucky without, because in both cases we’re here and we’re alive.

Thanks, Stickup Artist.

rahina q.h. said...

your first paragraph holds my attention 'what formerly was taken for “real life” is now preposterous and even untenable, and must be appreciated and understood as fiction if it is to be plausible and liveable at all.'
it caught me as i struggle with my idea of reality and others considering it preposterous and untenable... lovely words i like living the preposterous and untenable....
good both computers are in working order;)

William Michaelian said...

Or in some strange semblance thereof. Rereading that passage now makes me smile, even more than it did the first time around. It’s just the sort of thing that used to get me bad grades in school — a place even more preposterous and untenable for me than “real life.”

nouvelles couleurs - vienna atelier said...

Online again :-) this is nice that you are here again so I can read you

I agree completely with what you said about read books, books are our great tresour, people should not keep money in the safe but the books, so, if it an end of the world really would come, they would be important like food

William Michaelian said...

Hi, Laura — yes, and the door of the safe would always be open, and on top of the safe there would be more books, and if we’re hungry when the world ends, we will read cookbooks!

Joseph Hutchison said...

Welcome back, William! Another great thing about books: they don't just willy-nilly break down. This is why I don't want mine to exist only out there in the ether, in a Cloud owned and operated by someone who can erase them whenever they cease being profitable or politically desirable. Best folks like us should maintain our personal gateways to the other worlds beyond the Cloud, eh?

William Michaelian said...

What’s funny, Joe, is how that very word, Cloud, brings peace and comfort to the mind, even while, as you say, in this case all it takes is for someone to pull the plug and — poof! As much as I enjoy and value the online experience, and hesitate to differentiate between it and what transpires face to face, preferring a this too rather than an instead of approach and view, I’m ever intrigued by how easy it is for me to slip wholly into the world of text and touch and page, and to feel gone beyond any need of return. I don’t know whether I let myself go, or am taken. Probably both. And yet, all the same, I love the appearance of the written word on the electronic page. Wherever it’s arranged with care to its best advantage, there too am I. But trust? Beyond lightning, I’m too old (or old-fashioned) to trust even in the light emanating from my little desk lamp, leave alone the Cloud or Web (as beautiful as spiders are, and as intricate as their silken manufacture). Enough! Through and despite it all, we somehow meet. How can we not be grateful?

Transcend Designs said...

glad to hear you're up and running again, and that your computer is fixed too...!
I've been taking a bit of a hiatus myself,
though it wasn't due to technical difficulties...

such is the way of man-made contraptions...

William Michaelian said...

Thanks, Brad! Yes, and in the meantime, I’m still using the old shovels and tools my father and his father used....