Thursday, October 4, 2012

Shakespeare St. Louis Fair Souvenir Pin, 1904










Complete Works of Shakespeare

10 Volumes

Philadelphia : David McKay


4 comments:

Ed Baker said...

just opening a book that is just here... a brand new
hard-back first edition a $55 book for $6.30 !
The Well - Made BOOK
Essays & Lectures By Daniel Berkeley Updike
edited by William Peterson

here is what is on the wrap:

"The practice of typography, if it be followed faithfully,
is hard work - full of detail, full of petty restrictions, full of drudgery, and not greatly rewarded as men now count rewards. There are times when we need to bring to it all the history and art and feeling that we can, to make it bearable. But in the light of history, and of art, and of knowledge and of man's achievement, it is as interesting a work as exists - a broad and humanizing employment which can indeed be followed merely as a trade, but which if perfected into an art, or even broadened into a profession, will perpetually open new horizons to our eyes and new opportunities to our hands."

- Daniel Berkeley Updike

William Morris was his metro ! In 1958 I almost dropped out of high school to be an apprentice printer with Mr. Lean... he died... so ...here I am.

they replicated the Founder's Caslon exactly to do this book

this typeface was Updike's favorite... you shld see the curl that goes from the top of the "c" to the next letter... NEAT !

Updike was Merrymount Press in Boston.. he died the year I was born 1941...


Ed Baker said...

MENTOR NOT "metro" .. these walmart bifocals

suck !

Ed Baker said...

here is the kind of printing press that I learned on
at Stuart Junior High 1951-53... in Print Shop
and the teacher was Mr. Woods..

http://www.kyforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Printing-Press_425.jpg


hand set the led tyyp that was in a sectioned box ( I forget what it was called)

we had to know by heart where every letter was.

and we were tested on how fast we could set-up a paragraph"trick"? was to mix a little red ink in with the black to make the reader concentrate on what he was reading... even trickier was left page printed in a blue-black and the right hand page in a red-black..

notice in old books that there ar two colors .. red and black..

then.. the paper was VERY important...

book production today is ... crap!


William Michaelian said...

The red and black saw a lot of use especially in the old French editions on those distinctive title pages.

Type with character — what a concept! and what subtle power to convey.

(I know the c-curl whereof you speak.)

Every printer’s devil should have a metro mentor.

Good picture of the old press, like an underworld forge, gasping and letting off steam.